Friday, February 26, 2010

First Line Challenge

Are you ready to get your creative juices flowing?

I'll give you the first sentence or two of a famous novel, and your job is to turn it into a paragraph that is totally unique, and totally you!

Authors and characters are all welcome to attempt this little exercise. Let's see how many different perspectives we can create. As a bonus, try to guess the book that's being quoted. Hint: This week's starter is from an unauthorized prequel to a classic novel that we've already featured for "First Line Challenge."

(Incidentally, the last opener was from The Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain.)

Okay, are you ready? Here we go!

They say when trouble comes close ranks, and so the white people did. But we were not in their ranks. The Jamaican ladies had never approved of my mother...

16 comments:

Marenya said...

I have no idea what this means by "white people." Are they ghosts? Or very pale and sick? How horrible!

Nutmeg Cross said...

Do you not have different races where you come from, Marenya?

Indigo Cypress said...

Here in America, we have lots of different races... and sometimes, they're referred to by their skin color, which has never really made much sense to me.

For instance, I would call Meg a "white" person because she's Caucasian, even though she's kind of an olive or peachy color (depending on how much sun's she gotten lately). And she'd call me a "red" person because I'm a full-blooded Cherokee. But I'm not really red at all - just a tannish brown.

Nutmeg Cross said...

Well put, Indy. And, for the record, I don't call you a "red" person. But, hopefully, Marenya understands this craziness a little better now.

Marenya said...

We do have many races. They are sprites, dwarves, elves, human and Hanorja. I believe you are talking about differences in humans. I have never seen one, so I did not know that they come in a variety of colors.

My own people have skin the color of milky tea, with red, blonde or auburn hair.

Jesse Littleton said...

Well, now that we've got THAT all straightened out, it's on with the game!

They say when trouble comes close ranks, and so the white people did. But we were not in their ranks. The Jamaican ladies had never approved of my mother...

...for she was, quite frankly, a bit of a tramp. I mean, one can hardly blame them for despising her so - they were much too worried about holding on to their rich husbands to appreciate her good qualities, such as her keen sense of humor or the way she could sniff out a truffle in the underbrush.

Wait, are there truffles in Jamaica?

Marybeth Littleton said...

I surely hope you're not talking about me, Jesse.

Jesse Littleton said...

Oh, Mother, for Pete's sake. It's just a game.

Gabby said...

approved of my mother either because, although both of her parents had been a wholesome ebony, she was as white as the palest of the English ladies. Neither fish nor fowl, she was left to face adversity alone. Well, not really alone, because we, her five pepper and salt children, were ready to fight for her with every weapon at our disposal. Because we loved her. To us she was neither black nor white but our own special angel.

Ginger said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Ginger said...

because she refused to cross the street in disdain when the black ladies came by. She actually looked them in the eyes and said, "Good morning" as if she were glad to see them. As well, she gave them our outgrown clothing and toys for their babies, and visited their homes and drank tea in their kitchens. So when the troubles started, the white ladies shut my mother out as surely as if she were dark-skinned.

Ginger said...

Jesse, I believe truffles only grow in France. Unless you mean chocolate truffles. I could sniff those out easily! LOL!

Jesse Littleton said...

Thanks for the tip, Ginger. Living underground, I tend to forget where things grow on the surface.

But you and Devi must be kindred spirits - she can sniff out chocolate truffles, too. Isn't that right, honey?

Devi Marconi said...

I'm afraid it's true. I've never met a truffle I didn't like.

Elaine 'still writing' Smith said...

They say when trouble comes close ranks, and so the white people did. But we were not in their ranks. The Jamaican ladies had never approved of my mother. With riches came respect. With colour came kin. We had no riches and we had no family near. We were pitied by whites and black alike. Poor white trash. The Jamaican ladies disapproved but they shared the little they had to spare. The whites folks spared us little but their scorn, snears and the sight of their frosty, cold shoulders. When trouble came the social circles pulled in tight like them Roman turtles with shields high against the slings and arrows of misfortune.
When trouble came it found its mark like cold, hard steel to the heart - my heart.

Ginger said...

Elaine, you gave me chills!