Monday, December 14, 2009

Getting to Know You: Holiday Traditions

With Hanukkah ongoing and Christmas and New Year's on the horizon, let's talk about our favorite holiday traditions!












What holidays do you celebrate at this time of year? Do you follow old customs, or find unique new ways to enjoy the holiday with your loved ones?














Do you go caroling, decorate a tree, attend religious services, or share a feast with your family? Do you travel, or stay close to home?

Let's talk about the holiday traditions we like best!


22 comments:

Kalila said...

We went caroling for the first time ever last year. It was fun!

Vic said...

The snacks on the bus were fun, Kalila. But singing about reindeer and Baby Jesus? Not so much.

Kalila said...

But it was a great publicity stunt, Vic. I'm just annoyed Ricky didn't have faith in us.

Ricky said...

Do you realize how easily it could've turned into a disaster, Kalila? Besides, there's just something wrong about a demon metal band going Christmas caroling.

Kalila said...

I'm not list-en-ing...

So, guys, we're going to do it again this year, right? Don't tell Ricky!

Nevin said...

I think Christmas carols are lovely, Kalila. I'm looking forward to it.

Vic said...

Round up a few girls to go with us on the bus, and I'm in. Type O preferred.

I don't suppose there are any Christmas songs about bats? That would be a good tradition, if you ask me.

Nevin said...

We should also sponsor a family for the holidays. We could provide a nice Christmas dinner and some presents!

Vic said...

Let's not get carried away, Nevin. One Christmas tradition is ghastly enough.

Daryl Harper said...

Wow! A demon metal band Christmas caroling?

I'd definitely pay to see that.

(And I promise I won't tell Ricky where you'll be.)

Devi Marconi said...

The people of Ruby Hollow love to celebrate holidays... and because we've become a melting pot of various cultures and religions - from French Catholics to Cheyenne Indians - we celebrate a wide array of holiday traditions.

In February, for instance, we honor both Valentine's Day as well as the Chinese New Year.

But, around Christmastime, we host a variety of activities that, incidentally, are open to everyone - adults and children alike. We do try to be tolerant and accepting, after all.

Yesterday, we celebrated Hanukkah with a Festival of Lights throughout the Hollow. On Friday, we'll host a gingerbread house bake-off in the dining hall. And then, of course, during the rest of the month, we'll have the Yuletide ball on Christmas Eve, the Christmas concert on Christmas Day, a New Year's Eve dance, and a New Year's Day luncheon.

One of my favorite events, however, takes place the night of New Year's Day - which is also known as Discovery Day, a festival to honor the 1949 discovery of the hot springs (which Jesse and I were responsible for).

Then, after all that celebrating, the winter school term starts the next day. And the young Hollowites are ever so happy about that. :-)

Nutmeg Cross said...

That sounds so wonderful, Devi! Some days, I really wish I could live down there. Christmas is going to be especially hard this year... being so far away from my family. But I can't turn back now. And at least I have Indy. The holiday season would be much sadder alone.

Nevin said...

Devi, can I come to your gingerbread house bake-off? I'm afraid I'm not very good at baking but I'd love to help with the decorating!

Devi Marconi said...

Oh, Nevin, I'd love for you to join us - we could definitely use help with the decorations. I'm just not sure how that would work. We're kind of a secret society, you know. No visitors allowed.

But still.... you're a fairy, right? Do you have the ability to shape-shift? That could come in handy. (Or maybe Kalila could work some magic of her own...)

Olivia Harper said...

Incidentally, Nevin, I think it's a wonderful idea to sponsor a family for the holidays!

Any ideas who we should help? I'm in, for sure!

Nevin said...

Devi, unless Ruby Hollow has magical protection, I could go down there anytime I wanted. I respect humans' desire for privacy, though. I would never go where I felt unwelcome.

Olivia, I'm not sure how we would find a family to help. I thought there were human charities that organized such things. I'm afraid I get overwhelmed when I try to find out more. You humans have charities for almost everything. The other day, I wanted to find out how to help the pandas and ended up donating to a beagle rescue, a snail conservatory, an heirloom tomato preservation society, and an orphanage!

Vic said...

What's an heirloom tomato, fairy? Seems like a dumb thing to pass down through generations. It would stink after only a few weeks.

Jason said...

We used to have a tree and gifts on Christmas Eve. Reminded us why we fought in the war.

But it's been a long time.

Aidan said...

Hey Kae, let's go get a tree. We can strap it to the top of your Bugatti.

Olivia Harper said...

Oh, Vic, sometimes you amaze me. Heirloom tomatoes are delicious!

And yes, Nevin, there are tons of charities in the human world - some more trustworthy than others. I'm all for rescuing beagles, though. Where do you think we found Buddy?

Buddy Harper said...

Arf! Arf! Happy to be rescued! Arf! Arf!

Candy said...

Ruby Hollow sounds a wonderful, fun place - if only it weren't underground.
When I was a kid we often spent Christmas with my grandparents in Worcestershire. Granny had spent ages preparing mince pies and tarts so the cottage was rich with smells of baking and carols from the old radio were background to the chatter of relatives who hadn't met for a whole year.
There was food everywhere: a wheel of cheese on the table, luscious candied fruit, Christmas cake with a thick layer of marzipan. We nibbled from morning til time for our dinner of turkey,stuffing done in the bird (No one had discovered its dangers then, but non of us died) brussels sprouts, mashed potatoes. Slatherings of gravy smothered everything . The grown ups had wine and we kids grew flushed from hot cider. At the end of the meal Gran brought in the Christmas pudding, flaming from the brandy she had poured over it.There were lucky sixpences baked into the pudding and we shrieked with delight when we found one and stashed it safely in a pocket to hold for luck when needed during the coming year.We then pulled crackers, read the jokes that fell out and put on the paper hats, laughing and pointing at each other.
But, without fail, for me the room would begin to spin.The smells of food became unbearable and the merriment infuriating as I crawled under the table to hide,suffering in miserable solitude and all the time praying I wouldn't throw up over the shoes surrounding me below the hanging edge of the table cloth. Over and over I swore to never touch Granny's rich lethal plum pudding again.
Of course I did -year after year - and always with the same disastrous results. But it sure was good!