Friday, December 25, 2009

First Line Challenge

Are you ready to get your creative juices flowing!  I will give you a sentence (or part of a sentence) from the opening of a famous book.  Your job is to turn it into a paragraph that is totally unique, and totally you!

Authors and characters are all welcome to try this little exercise.  Let's see how many different perspectives we can create.

Last week's opener was from Murder on the Orient Express. 

Okay, are you ready?  Here we go.

Matthias cut a comical little figure as he wobbled his way along the cloisters...

16 comments:

Candy said...

Mathias cut a comical little figure as he wobbled his way among the cloisters, but in his mind he strode tall and strong and his heart sang with joy for it was Christmas and soon he would ring the great bell which would awaken the townspeople to this wonderful day. Children would tumble, laughing, from their doorways while smiling parents watched and waved to their neighbors. Dogs would run in circles barking and biting the snow which had fallen overnight and delicious aromas would pour from kitchens. And all this would begin when he rang the bell. Mathias took the thick rope in his hands and began to pull feeling as strong and fine as any man ever could, and his laughter joined the pealing in the tower above.

Laura Martone said...

What a wonderful Christmas scene, Candy! Thank you - and happy holidays to you!

Daryl Harper said...

Matthias cut a comical little figure as he wobbled his way along the cloisters...

...hoping that the monks wouldn't be miffed with him again. For the third time in a week, he'd broken his vow of silence. But who could be quiet with so much nonsense going on in the world?

Paul (Peace Keeper) said...

Matthias cut a comical little figure as he wobbled his way along the cloisters. Paul turned away. The other heroes were not his concern now. Now, he had a city to save. He nodded to Blue Bow as he took off to the east, and to Flutterby as she took to the air to the west. The light of Astalorn's energy patterns, constantly redrawing themselves around him, fell across the metal armor of Paul's shoulders, and then he was gone. Paul stood on the rooftop alone, listening to the night's bitter cold wind whip across the sharp corners of his armor. Tonight, the heroes would find the traitor, and bring him down. With luck, they wouldn't lose any more of their number than they already had. A video game had never been this deadly serious; though, he supposed, this wasn't really a video game anymore. Real people were getting hurt, real crimes were being committed, and they had a real villain to hunt down. He dropped into a sprint across the rooftop and as he approached the edge, he saw the next rooftop, and the expanse between them opened into a drop many stories high. He pulled his expandable quarterstaff off his arm and it sprang to its full 6 ft length. Jabbing it into the edge of the rooftop, his blue and green armored body glided silently across the gulf and landed at a run on the other side. Tonight, thought Paul, the Peace Keeper is at war.

~Peace Keeper, Hero Games

Laura Martone said...

Intriguing, Paul. I love the different paths that authors take with these "first line challenges" - too cool.

David Jace said...

Well, Laura,I think part of that is guided by the 'world' that the character is already in. If I use a sci-fi, planet-busting character, then I have to twist the starter line into that concept. If it's a historical romance, same thing. Each character will, by necessity, perceive the first line in terms they understand, based on their own background. It's a human concept that is actually crucial to good characterization. :)

(And I, too, enjoy it. Sorry, I'm not supposed to be teaching again until after New Years, but some things you can't really help! Merry Day-After-Christmas.)

Laura Martone said...

Too true, David. Too true.

Merry Day-After-Christmas to you as well! Enjoy your break from teaching. ;-)

Christine H said...

This was from the book "Redwall," by the way.

I want to wish everyone a fond farewell, at least for now. I am cutting back on my extracurricular blogging in order to try to finish my novel, since I didn't finish it this year and I'd really like to stop making it my New Year's resolution to "finish the book." In February it will be three years since Marenya and Faldur first came into being. Although a lot has happened in those three years, I'd still like to Move On With My Life (and theirs.)

So Thank You everyone who has made CIC such a fun-filled part of my life! Happy New Year to all of our authors and characters.

David Jace said...

But CiC isn't ending, is it? The other moderators will still keep it going, right?

Elaine 'still writing' Smith said...

Matthias cut a comical little figure as he wobbled his way along the cloisters...
he gathered the trailing length of brown cassock Brother Frederick called "growing room" into his arms and stumbled on. He wasn't sure if praying to be four inches taller, at God's earliest convenince, was sacriligious but, even if it was, he would have to add this sin to the many he was sure already stained his soul because he wasn't sure he could survive even another day of skidding in waves of woven wool, and live to tell the tale.

Christine H said...

David, I'm not sure what the status is. I know Mira is also dropping out for now, but I'm not sure what Laura and Ann have decided. It's more work running the blog than it seems.

David Jace said...

Oh, I'm quite sure it is! Finding something "new" every day is quite a job. And then trying to make sure you are "on top of" things as things are posted, keeping enough of a hand in to make sure nothing grows stale or stagnant...

I know it's a job, I would just be so sorry to see it go...

Christine H said...

Me, too.

Laura Martone said...

I'd be sorry to see it go, too, David, which is why I'm sticking with it. :-)

But, unless I find other moderators to help, I'll probably only be posting once or twice a week. I'm going crazy as it is with my travel blog and latest travel guide!

Anyhoo... I'll miss you, Christine. Good luck with your novel. Completing my final revision is my New Year's resolution, too - and I've been working on mine three times as long as you have (yes, that's right, nearly a decade), so don't feel bad. ;-)

David Jace said...

Wish I could offer to help; I'd be proud to be a part of it, but the next couple months are going to be extra busy for me. *sigh* I really hope things work out. This is such an excellent site. I've been tipping it to some of my better students, in hopes that they will come and be apart of it.

Laura Martone said...

David - I'm truly heartened to hear how much folks like you appreciate CIC... I feel blessed to have been a part of it the last few months, and I hope it will continue for many months to come!