Friday, December 4, 2009

First Line Challenge

Are you ready to get your creative juices flowing!  I will give you a sentence (or part of a sentence) from the opening of a famous book.  Your job is to turn it into a paragraph that is totally unique, and totally you!

Authors and characters are all welcome to try this little exercise.  Let's see how many different perspectives we can create.

Bonus points for anyone who can identify the book the sentence(s) are from.  Last week's line was from Pride and Prejudice.  Okay, are you ready? Here we go...

In a hole in the ground there lived a....

33 comments:

Shannon O'Donnell said...

What a great blog! Thanks for dropping by Book Dreaming. :)

Aidan said...

In a hole in the ground there lived a demon named Maliquium. In chains. Never saw the light of day again.

Hey, a guy can dream, can't he?

Vic said...

...vampire. He liked his grave. It was cool and well-shaded from the sun. This vampire was ambitious, though. He aspired to one day have a mausoleum.

Jesse Littleton said...

In a hole in the ground there lived...

...an entire village of people, called the Hollowites. Just so we're clear, they weren't mole people or freaks of nature. They were just tired of living on the surface, where wars occurred, poverty was rampant, and people didn't make sense.

(I couldn't resist, could I?)

Devi Marconi said...

Darn it, Jesse! You stole my idea. The Hollow seemed the obvious way to go, didn't it? Hehehe.

Olivia Harper said...

Well, then, Mom, I'll try something a little different.

In a hole in the ground there lived a...

...beagle named Buddy. He was a very sweet beagle - friendly to all who knew him - but he was a bit of a scaredy cat, too. Fireworks and storms frightened him most of all. On July 4th especially, he'd often be seen scrambling into his hole during the nighttime fireworks display. Poor little guy. What beauty he missed.

Buddy Harper said...

Arf! Arf! Hey! Arf! Arf!

Samantha Harper said...

Oh, Buddy, don't be offended. Mom didn't mean anything by it... and it is true, after all. You are a bit of a scaredy cat. But we love you anyway.

Daryl Harper said...

In point of fact, Mom, if Buddy tried to live in a hole on South Padre, he'd be living in a puddle. The water table's very high on the island.

Olivia Harper said...

Really, Daryl? I had no idea. I've only been living here for two decades.

It's... a... story. Nothing more.

Wait. Shouldn't you and Sam be in class right about now?

Daryl and Samantha Harper said...

Uh... gotta go! See you later, Mom.

Gabby said...

In a hole in the ground there lived a man who had never had home nor family, he could remember, and whose only friend was the dreamchild who came at night and took him to worlds unknown to any other human - yet.

Candy said...

In a hole in the ground there lived a very small ex angel who had been thrown out of heaven for her terrible misdeeds. Since then storms had rattled the earth and many said it was her tears which were drowning people all over the world.

Marenya said...

nasty villain, who used his magical powers to control others and try to take over the kingdom. But he was foiled by someone he was foolish enough to overlook.

Faldur said...

In a hole in the ground there lived an oversized bear who was fond of making vague remarks about the inadequacy of Rangers, eating honeycombs and smoking a pipe.

Raynor said...

a miserable captive who just wanted to go home and be himself again.

Ginger said...

sweet bunny rabbit named Miss Cornelia who had a tiny ruffled apron, a tiny ruffled cap, and a little teapot with blue violets painted on it. She invited all of her friends for dandelion tea and seedcakes with clover honey.

One day a mean old fox decided to wait outside her hole to catch her friends as they left, for they would be slow and fat with all they had eaten. But Miss Cornelia spied his whiskers, and threw a pot of scalding hot tea into his face. He shrieked and put his paws over his burning eyes while all of her friends ran home. He never bothered her again.

The End

Ginger said...

(Sometimes I tell Susan's girls bedtime stories.)

Elaine 'still writing' Smith said...

pink, segmented worm who had taken streamlined to a place that was both streamy and liney - well linear anyway. It had stripped down the kinds of extraneous, dangly pieces other life forms seemed to favour to the bare bones. Pardon my worm humour I just thought you ought to know that Annelid was a highly evolved kind of critter.

Olivia Harper said...

What a wonderful bedtime story, Ginger. Although, quite frankly, I'm happy that my mother told me the legend of Ruby Hollow instead. Yours might have given me nightmares.

Devi Marconi said...

You're welcome, sweetie.

Indigo Cypress said...

Worms usually are highly evolved, Elaine. At least more so than us humans give them credit for.

Calvin Mertz said...

. . . rat faced little man named Critter. Small, both in stature and thought, Critter was well known for the cinder block of a chip he carried on his shoulder that made him easy prey for bullies. His fauning subservience and razor wits captured the protection of a Lord who knew how to utilize Critter's talents for insignificance.

Until he betrayed his benefactor - almost to the master's death - and someone managed to kill the little f*&% before I could get to him first.

Sorry, got a little caught up in the spirit of the task. Nevermind, I'll leave the writing to my author.

Nutmeg Cross said...

Um, that was interesting, Cal. Very graphic.

Ahem.

But I'm still stumped on the book. Is it The Hobbit?

Amy Thompson said...

Oh Gabby and Candy, I'd read those stories! I'm living in the 9/11 era and all I can think of to fill the hole in the ground is a missile, and horrible person who's just itching to turn a key and end all thought of reconciliation with my children.

Dream Children and Fallen Angels would be very nice to read about right now.

Calvin Mertz said...

Thanks Meg!

I sure hope its THE HOBBIT, or my symbolism is way off.

Ginger said...

Olivia, the girls love it when the sweet little character gets the better of the bad guy. And have you read any Beatrix Potter lately? Oh my!

Christine H said...

Yes, Cal, you are correct! :o)

Christine H said...

Nutmeg ~ You are correct, too!

Nutmeg Cross said...

Cool. Thanks, Christine. I love being right about things. It happens so rarely. :-(

Indigo Cypress said...

Aw, Meg. Don't be silly. You're right lots of the time.

Olivia Harper said...

Good point, Ginger. Bedtime stories are often scary for kids... not just Beatrix Potter, but Hans Christian Andersen, the Brothers Grimm, even Roald Dahl. But I sure do love them!

Nutmeg Cross said...

Thanks, Indy.